Prescription
Mexico

Prescription Medications
X List

Lowest Price!
No Prescription!
Worldwide Shipping!
  Home     FAQ     About  
  Browse our products: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z



Prescription Medications

HealthCare News Headline

Tip-Over Furniture Can Kill Kids

WEDNESDAY, July 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- It can happen in an instant: A small child pulls up on a television, dresser or computer monitor and gets critically injured when the furniture tips over.

"Every parent or guardian of a young child should look around their homes and imagine what could tip over, fall off walls and injure a child. Imagining it is better than it becoming a reality," Dr. Alex Rosenau, president of the American College of Emergency Physicians, said in a college news release.

Read entire article...
Xaden
Xagrid
Xalatan
Xanef
Xanthomax
Xanthotoxin
Xatral
Xeloda
Xenecal
Xenical
Xenid
Xerendip
Xet
Xibimer
Xilatril
Xilometazolina
Ximaken
Ximovan
Xipen
Xipral
Xlash
Xuzal
Xylocaine
Xylometazolin
Xylometazoline
Xylotox
Xysal
Xyzal


Some others: Ofloksacin, Pepdine, Nuclosina, Estradiolo, Flecaine, Lepargylic acid, Tertensif, Telithromycine, Reandron 1000, ...

Other Names
 


HealthCare News

Media Multitasking Might Have Mental Upside

MONDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- Media multitasking -- the use of more than one type of media or technology at the same time -- may have some positive effects, a new study suggests.

The potential negative mental aspects of media multitasking -- which is especially common in young people and could include instant messaging, music, Web surfing, emailing, online videos, computer games or social networking -- have received widespread publicity. But there's another side to the story, suggests the study, which was published April 12 in the Psychonomic Bulletin & Review.

Previous research has shown that media multitaskers tend to have deficits in certain areas of mental function, such as task switching, selective attention and working memory. This may be because multitaskers pay attention to multiple sources of information instead of focusing on information relevant to the task at hand.

The new study of 63 people aged 19 to 28, however, found that those who multitask frequently appear to be better at integrating information from multiple senses -- vision and hearing in this case -- when asked to perform a specific task.

Read entire article...

Copyright 2016 Prescription-Mexico.com Terms of Service